The Four D’s

I like to plan things in my life. I meticulously planned my career. I have a work-out routine and a work-out plan. I like to plan my daily activities for each week at least one week ahead. And I am extensively planning my finances. But no matter how good the plan is, there is always a chance that something unexpected happens, something that will throw your plans into a limbo. That’s just how it is. There is always something that can be difficult to be taken into account.

The four Ds refer to exactly these kind of circumstances, and while they are hard to plan, they are so frequent that the term “the four Ds” became financial jargon among insurers and financial advisors. These unexpected events more than often create uncertainty in our lives, and effect not only our physical and mental health, but also our finances in a dramatic way. These events are:

  • Disease
  • Divorce
  • Disaster
  • Death

Each of these terms is pretty much self-explanatory, but nevertheless let me share a few words on each point either way.

Disease will obviously seldom refer to a cold, a flu, or a fever. But it will refer to an unexpected development like the need for a surgery, a diagnosis with a severe illness like cancer or diabetes. It might also not be directly concerned with you, but with someone you care and are or feel responsible for.

Divorce is further down the line, but given that roughly some 50% of all marriages fail, it’s a pretty common event that can and will have dramatic consequences on one’s financial situation.

Disaster used to be less common, but with all the floods and fires across the globe, earth quakes, tsunamis and who knows what else is about to happen in the next months and years to come, it’s a very valid one. A disaster can literally demolish an entire life of financial investments, especially for those who focused on real estate and other physical forms of storage of value.

Death is the last one, and while even one’s own death is not for free, I’d rather consider this to be an event concerned to people who are close to us. Expenses for a funeral might come hand in hand with the need for additional financial support to someone you care about. In some instances with your direct family, you might also not inherit what you expect. It can happen that instead of adding assets to your net value calculation you get surprised with additional leverage (debt/loans) that need to be balanced and that will fall under your responsibility.

Billions of people throughout many generations have had experience with each of those Ds, and while it’s impossible to know when one of them will hit you, it certainly is possible to prepare for each one of them.

Take the time to think about this.
It will be time well spent.