What a year

Today is the 14th of November 2020, and what a year this has been! With only 6 weeks to go and all the bad news going on, all I want at this point is for it to end.

Whatever your idea or opinion about the Coronavirus might be, we have to acknowledge plain facts that it had an immense impact on literally the world as a whole. This is beyond anything my generation experienced so far.

Jobs were and are being destroyed, incomes diminished, entire industries shut down, and thousands of people are still dying across the globe. And just to be clear: Whether it’s a direct or indirect count, if the virus triggers the death, then it’s on Covid to me.

Since I am working in the hotel industry, I am directly affected by it. In order for my business to survive, I need to cut expenses, reduce jobs, reduce salaries. It hurts. It’s many tears and many broken hearts. Many tough decisions every single day. And despite having the promise of a vaccine now visible on the horizon, we still have a few more months of pain and suffering ahead.

Also let me share with you this: As a business insider in an executive role, I can tell you here and now that this won’t get better any soon. Even post-covid. For most, the jobs that were cut aren’t coming back. The recovery of the service industry, the largest industry in the world, will take years. In order to survive cost cuts will remain in place until further notice.

Financial independence has never been more important

What I am sharing and trying to explain above is that the world is not going to get really significantly better any soon. And even if, how do we know that there won’t be another outbreak in one, two, or five years from now?

We have learned that there is no such thing as invulnerability. There is no such thing as total job security. And when times get really tough, even the best employers might be forced to make some tough choices to the detriment of employees.

Business owners face even greater risks, especially when they operate on thin margins and have not sufficient funds to survive prolongued periods of time without a regular income.

So what are our choices? How can we financially prepare for such an event?

There aren’t many choices, frankly, and there is no single solution. What we have to do is to create layers of protection. To create multiple income streams. And being invested in the stock market is one such strong layer. Also during the current crisis, it has again shown to be a reliable protection for tough times.

I am not talking about the value of my shares. I am down 25% in my portfolio so far. What I am talking about are dividends, my passive income stream.

Let me compare it with my salary, which is currently being cut by 25%. Next month it will be probably around 30%. At its peak, the cut was at 40%. But my dividends have decreased by only 11% year on year. And while I am not certain about my salary, I am quite confident for my dividends to fully recover next year.

Some of the most reliable dividend companies have not changed their policies and kept paying the same or even increased amounts throughout the crisis. This has again reconfirmed with me that for those who seek financial independence, being invested in the market is essential.

This crisis has been a huge reminder that we need to take responsibility for our financial well-being into our own hands. We can’t always rely on others, not to mention governments.

And it’s not just about the money. It’s about having that pressure off your chest, knowing that you have one more layer of safety, one that will contribute to protecting you and your loved ones when times are tough. This feeling alone is beyond any monetary value.

What the pandemic is teaching us

As I am writing these lines, we are into the 8th month of the pandemic. And as this year has only 9 more weeks left before coming to a painful end, it doesn’t look like the pandemic would stop there. We are in for a long and rough ride ahead with several more months to get through.

But every challenge bears also opportunities, and during these 8 months, there were already plenty of lessons for us to remember for the future ahead. Especially when it comes to our jobs and finances.

Lesson 1: There is no such thing as job security

The first lesson was to recognize that there is no such thing as “job security” when a real crisis hits. Given how our economies are connected and intertwined worldwide, any crisis that comes on a global scale is likely to effect employees and business owners everywhere and in almost every industry.

This pandemic showed us how quickly companies find ways to reduce staff counts and reduce payrolls. Whether people get furloughed, put on unpaid leaves, or forced to accept pay-cuts. When a crisis hits, people suffer. So one would do better preparing for such an eventuality.

Lesson 2: Emergency funds make sense

I wrote about emergency funds before, but let me repeat it again: Everyone should have an emergency fund that covers 3-6 months worth of expenses. More cautious types might even consider saving for up to 12 months.

Having an emergency fund won’t negate your worries when a crisis hits, but it will certainly ease them. Knowing that you don’t need to panic when the next rent or utility payment is due is already a huge relief. Not having the immediate pressure or struggle to afford your regular daily, weekly, and monthly expenses will keep your head clear and allow you to focus on finding the right solution to the challenge at hand, without the pressure or need to compromise on less adequate opportunities.

Lesson 3: One source of income is not enough

It’s good to have an emergency fund, but to increase your defenses even further, you should also not rely on a single source of income. Creating multiple income streams is a critical step not only for those who plan to retire with a better standing but also for those who want to prepare for emergencies.

Lesson 4: Be prepared to help others

If you have an emergency fund, additional sources of income, and are even able to keep your job while a crisis is spreading across the globe, then you have generated a unique opportunity for yourself: You can protect yourself and those in your care, and you might also be able to support others.

A friend in need, a local shelter for the homeless, or an orphanage. There is always someone in need. Whether it’s money, food, or clothes. Giving feels good, and even more so in such a difficult time.

This may take a little longer

A few of us were looking forward to seeing the stock markets recover during the last quarter of 2020, which started only 12 days ago. But as we are moving into the 38th week of this year, there is little reason to believe that the markets will start to rise again any soon.

Many businesses have been scaled down, people furloughed, budgets cut, investments deferred, assets repurposed. A vaccine for the virus seems still far off, but even if we would get it tomorrow, it will take more than a few months to get to where things were before. How long? Nobody knows.

Be greedy when others are fearful

Following the advice of Warren Buffett, investors should get greedy when others are fearful. The meaning behind this is of course that when stock prices are in free fall, it usually is a good time to be looking out for good bargains. But is the market now really already fearful? Is it a good time to be looking out for bargains?

The truth is that nobody really knows. Some shares may fall again. Others may rise. Some may be easier to analyze than others. But the universal rule remains valid in good and in bad times: There is no such thing as a bad time to invest in good companies.

My approach during this time remains the same as previously. I keep investing. I am buying companies that I believe to have a solid business, that will survive the current and future challenges, that continue paying dividends, and which I believe to continue doing all this for years to come.

While looking for the right companies at a good price, I also stick to my split-investment strategy. I am not putting all my money immediately into one stock, but invest only a limited amount first, and add to the position again a few months later on.

Following this strategy, I may not fully benefit from a stock price increase, but I limit my risk and have the opportunity to purchase more shares at a lower price in the event the stock price may fall.

Being greedy has never been good advice. Not being scared and having a strategy is in my opinion a better approach.

Nobody knows what the future holds

When you wake up in the morning, you never really know what the day will bring you. You might have a schedule. Some appointments. Places to go. People to meet. Things to do. But there is no guarantee that all these things will indeed happen.

A person you wanted to meet might cancel the appointment. The place you wanted to go might become not accessible for some reason. And the things you wanted to do might become less of a priority as the day evolves.

The same goes for any business, and of course, for stock investments.

We never know what will happen in the stock market. While promising news about some stocks you bought might have prevailed in the market during the last week and made you feel very confident of future gains and profits on your investment, a single unexpected event can turn everything around.

Hope can turn to fear. Smiles to tears. And instead of counting your imaginary wealth, you might scramble to think about how to manage the next rent payment.

Benefits of having a plan

This is where strategy and planning comes into play. Of course we cannot predict the future. Nobody can. But we can put systems and strategies in place to help us mitigate potential challenges and at the same time offer us the chance to take advantage of potential opportunities.

Those strategies to name a few include:

  • Having an emergency fund of 3 months or more of your regular income/expenses
  • Having an investment thesis, an investment plan
  • Diversifying investments across countries, industries, and currencies
  • Having a good mix of dividend-paying stocks and growth stocks
  • Being calm
  • Being patient
  • Having some investment cash ready on the side
  • Not being scared to sell a stock at a loss when the story behind it doesn’t match your investment thesis anymore
  • Not being scared to buy more shares of a company that is losing value, but that perfectly fits your investment thesis

Taking the time to plan ahead, and to continue working on this plan as we learn, as markets and industries develop, and as challenges arise while opportunities pop-up on unexpected fronts makes all the difference between successful investors and gamblers.

Breaking Rules

Nothing is as it should be this year. 2020 will go down in history as one of the worst years for my generations (X / Y – I am right on the brink).

Highest unemployment as far as I can remember across the globe. People are restricted to travel between countries, in some areas even between cities. Foodbanks, charities, and NGOs are stepping up and doing what they can to get people through hard times, even in the richest and most developed nations. Medical supplies are running short, equipment gets scarce. And governments are printing cash for people like there is no tomorrow.

Every weakness of our economic systems has been exposed by now. The mantra of a small government and an unhinged economy has been crushed to pieces. Whether it’s Germany, the US, UK or Thailand: Without government support it would all collapse.

It’s a terrible situation, but we will get through this, as humanity always did. There is light at the end of the tunnel, and I am confident that we will thrive again once this is all over.

And having said that, as bad as it is, it’s also a great lesson and experience for us. Instead of lamenting and complaining, we have right now the opportunity to analyze the situation and to think about how we can handle a similar occurrence in the future. Because we know that this wasn’t the first, and certainly won’t be the last pandemic that we will have to deal with.

Financial independence should grab more spotlight than ever before

The current situation showed lots of weakness in the structure of our society, especially to those who are in the rat race. As the crisis triggered massive unemployment, salary cuts, and put people in danger of losing access to their basic needs like shelter, food, and healthcare, it has never been more obvious that the rules we follow are flawed.

People are talking about jobs, minimum wages, worker protections. Protections from evictions, free medical support, and other measures to help all of us getting through the challenges of the pandemic. And it’s all good and right. We need to work, we need to have our rights protected, and we need a framework of rules to make sure those in power don’t abuse those who are not in a position to protect themselves.

Unfortunately, the same rules that protect us are also the rules that limit our opportunities. They push us into the rat race, into the dependence on people who employ us, and on governments that care for us. We give away some parts of our freedom and receive in return limited protection that helps us to make it through the days ahead.

But those who really want to get at least a slice of their freedom back, they got to break out of the rules and take ownership of their future. It’s especially situations like the current crisi, when financial independence becomes more important than ever.

Being financially independent means that you can afford to have a shelter without relying on the government, that you can put food on the table without relying on charities, and that your health is protected. Financial independence is not about getting rich. It’s about freedom.

The steps for reaching financial independence are only a few:

  • Earning as much as you can
  • Spending as little as possible
  • Saving and investing the surplus
  • Building passive income

Only four steps that explain it all. Simple and while not easy, definitely achievable with the right mind-set, plan and determination. And the benefits are immense. Not only may it allow you to retire early from your regular job. Achieving financial freedom will also empower you to pursue other paths and passions which you might have not considered previously due to financial commitments that couldn’t be neglected.

Even more importantly though, it will also prepare you for hardships, and situations as we are experiencing right now. It’s undeniable that those who build up emergency funds that cover 6-12 months of expenses, or who have passive income streams, are significantly less worried while the virus is causing panic and havoc across the world.

The FIRE movement is just a smart thing to do

When you explain the idea of financial independence and the FIRE movement to people who never thought about it, you will hardly find anyone who would disagree with it these days. There is nothing about massive unemployment, stagnant wages, and deteriorating economic conditions that would encourage people to go back to the old days.

And this is not a one-off event. It will happen again. Maybe it will be another virus. Maybe something else. But we know that hard ships are part of the equation throughout our lives. So wouldn’t it be a smart thing to do something about it? To prepare for it?

As my readers know, I am promoting investing in stocks. And surely, many companies got in trouble and had to cut or reduce their dividends, hence also impacting my passive income. But what this crisis showed me clearly is that while there is no 100% protection in this kind of environment, the odds are still clearly favouring investors over regular workers.

I work in the hardest hit industry of the pandemic: I am a hotel manager. And while my salary was cut by up to 40% as my hotel had to close for a few months, my passive dividend-income went down only by 9% on average year to date so far, and I expect it to remain on that level.

If you ever had doubts whether FIRE is for you, these doubts should be gone by now. And whether you invest in stocks or real estate, or any other way that generates passive income streams, it should be (or become) a part of your plan.

The pain continues… for some

We are now in the middle of the third quarter of 2020. August. And the world doesn’t look much better than it looked in the second quarter. In fact, despite all the happy talk that you might hear occasionally on some news, data points increasingly towards a bad fourth and final quarter as well.

So the pain will continue and might even increase. More companies will close their doors. More people might lose their jobs, or endure salary cuts. Many people will remain dependent on the support from governments, friends, families, or charitable institutions… and sometimes strangers.

The suffering is not equal

But some suffer more than others, and guess who is suffering the least? Well, from what I see, income investors have suffered very little in comparison to regular folks.

When I look at my income portfolio, it looks as bad as it gets with current total performance in value development of -29%. Almost a third of the money I invested has disappeared. On paper. In reality, it doesn’t disappear until I sell the shares – which I have no intention to do within the next 20 years or so.

But interestingly, my dividends for this year will be holding up much more stable. According to my most recent forecast, my dividend income for this year will fall only about -8%.

Cash is king

In a crisis like this, income investors have the advantage that most of their investments are/were around financially strong companies, which generate either strong cash flows or which are simply rich.

In addition to this, many dividend-paying companies tend to offer essential services. Whether it’s water, energy, food, or our most addictive tech-entertainment. Those companies keep earning money no matter what and can largely sustain their dividends even in a global crisis.

Having strong cash flows and/or a well-prepared emergency fund, those companies can navigate through the storm, and even use their strong cash position to grow and expand their business. One should not get surprised if the strongest among them come out even stronger after the crisis.

Technology is unstoppable

I have this year so far only added money to my speculative portfolio which has several technology titles in it that either benefit from the pandemic, or which are simply not relevant to the pandemic at all. And while my income portfolio shows a -29% performance, my speculative tech portfolio is already back up with double-digits and +25% in market value.

Some people are wondering why the technology sector keeps rising despite the harsh reality that we experience across the globe right now. But in fact, it’s not surprising. Technology will be moving forward no matter what, and being invested in a few solid technology-focused companies will probably serve as a great diversification to any portfolio for the foreseeable future to come.

Keep investing

So yes, I keep investing. I am currently not adding money to my dividend income portfolio, but plan to do so around October. August and September look still awfully bleak and we might see more bankruptcies, more unemployment, and more suffering. But the longer it will be going on, the closer we will get to a solution. I am, however, putting money into my speculative portfolio.

History has taught us, that after every crisis the market recovers. As a young investor, you should therefore not hesitate. Whether you go in with an ETF or individual stocks. Crisis or not, keep investing regularly, and diligently, and as we get closer to a solution to this awful pandemic, your efforts and trust in the market will very likely plan out according to similar events of the past and reward you in the long run.

There are of course no guarantees, but what is guaranteed these days anyway?

Investing in space

I mentioned it somewhere before, but I like to point it out one more time: Investors are in general positive people. Especially those who focus on the long term prospects of the world. We might be in a pandemic that is devastating economies across the globe right now. But most investors know that we will pass this, that the economy will come back, that new jobs will be created, and that this is not the end for humanity.

So naturally, every crisis is an opportunity, and when things turn doom and gloom for many, investors are trying to look beyond that, always on the look-out for some fresh straws of grass that start to (re-)grow from the ground.

Where does humanity go from here?

One such straw of grass for me is a future trend that is gathering tremendous momentum. The space industry.

I know: Space stations, space mining, space exploration, it all sounds like crazy stuff. And if you are not actively researching about it you might believe that this is something still far beyond our reach.

But you might get surprised how this is, in a sense, not a new industry at all, and how many players are already actively working in this field. I recently stumbled upon this amazing infographic from a company called “Seraphim Capital”, a specialist investor group:

The most recent launch of a SpaceX shuttle was a moving moment for me. It went so smooth and stable, one would even wonder how it was a special moment at all. But for those who don’t appreciate the significance of this: Sending people into space in such a safe and controlled manner, is like setting foot on a proper boat to cross an ocean for the first time. It opens up a new world for us. For an investor, this is an entirely new frontier opening up. Literally, a new world to discover.

Personally, I am invested in two companies that focus on this future business: One is Virgin Galactic (SPCE), and the second one is Hexcel Corp. (HXL). The first one is focusing on bringing people to space. Whether as tourists, future astronauts, or general space flight training and transportation. The second company is developing structural materials that can be used for various kinds of vehicles and protective systems, like for example hulls for planes and space ships, or possibly protective walls for a moon base.

There are endless options and the race is on

As you can see from the infographic, there are plenty of companies for investors to choose from. For those who prefer ETFs. I also found some which are focusing on space investments, but I can’t trade them in Europe so I also won’t talk about them here just yet. But whether it’s computer software or hardware, engines, communication systems, satellites, drones, navigational systems, data crunchers, launch services, protective equipment, … the opportunities seem endless… and the race is on!

Disclosure: I own SPCE and HXL.

Keeping investing in difficult times

There is a lot of “happy talk” from governments around the world promising a swift recovery and promoting a way back to a “new normal” on the immediate horizon. However, when listening to politicians we always need to keep in mind what their incentives are. Politicians have a vast interest in painting positive pictures because their positions and their re-elections might depend on it.

In times of crisis, it is better to listen to other voices, and in particular to businesses. Not to their press releases, which are also often overly positive to keep investors patient and calm. The more relevant information is flowing in the background: Are they hiring people or did they freeze their payrolls? Are research and development projects being continued? Did they request their financial partners to extend credit lines? Are assets being sold off or do they continue to add value with acquisitions? Are they scrambling to get through the crisis, or do they take the opportunity to eradicate weak-points in their business models?

You don’t need to DO the research

For large companies, you can trust that somebody is doing this research for you. Financial magazines, newspapers, analysts, online blogs. There is a lot of work being done by many people out there. All you need to do is to find this research, to read it, to evaluate it, and after reading a few of these sources, to form an opinion based on the information you received.

You can do this for individual companies, but as an investor, you definitely should do this for entire markets. The world’s most famous and successful investors read a lot, and the majority of what they read are assessments, opinions, and evaluations of products, services, trends, and opportunities.

People like Warren Buffett, Bill Gates. You don’t need to like them or to necessarily agree to their ideas and positions. But you should acknowledge that they have a significant amount of knowledge about what is happening in the world. They use this knowledge for their decision-making process, where to invest, which project to support. Which idea or business model, or charity offers the best chance of success, adding value to the market, to investors, and to potential customers or recipients of the product or service.

The picture is pretty bleak

Looking at what is happening in the markets right now, the picture is pretty clear. And pretty bleak. We are in a recession, one that might last a few years.

Almost every colleague of mine is on a salary cut, furloughed, or anxious that he might get into a challenging situation in the next few months to come. Companies in the travel sector are obviously heavily impacted, but also other sectors experience similar challenges. Job cuts, sales of assets, and project delays are mentioned daily basis in newspapers around the world. And while some economies started to slowly re-opening, cash-flows are still very far away from where they were in 2019. The numbers for the first half of 2020 will come in and will be reported in the next weeks to come, and it’s pretty safe to say that there will be some shocks ahead to those who kept listening to the happy talks of politicians.

All this doesn’t mean that you should stop investing

As I mentioned in a previous article, this could nevertheless be a great opportunity for investors. Every crisis has survivors and losers. And survivors usually come out stronger every time when they are challenged and pushed to improve, to re-invent, and to innovate. From my point of view, this crisis has pushed us into new investment territories by emphasizing the importance of sectors that were neglected in the past.

Technology is already a clear winner (again), but it’s worth taking a deeper look into it. Some areas of technology will shift into a stronger focus than others. Cybersecurity for example is such a sector. Work and freelance platforms are another.

Producers of hygiene products and business which focus on health & safety can expect long-term benefits for the years to come. But the same goes for companies which not many had on their radar like waste management systems, and water supply and filtration technologies. You know where all your germs go to every time you shower or visit the toilet, right?

Plenty of opportunities in every crisis

When you read enough, gather a sufficient amount of information and knowledge, and adapt your thinking to understand that there are opportunities in every challenge, then you will quickly realize that, crisis or not, there is no reason to ever stop investing.

The only limitation I would see is when you are running out of time. When you get old. But by that time, your portfolio should be the last worry you have. By that time, I would hope that you have had a successful investment history and that you can happily retire on your monthly dividend income.

Doing the right thing – with conscious investments

There is lot’s of discussions about whether investing in a company does anything to support it, hence whether purchasing shares of a company puts you in a position of responsibility for what the company stands for and for what it does. Let me address this today and tell you my point of view on this highly debated topic.

If you buy stock in a company you become, to a tiny part, owner of that company. As a co-owner of a business, you obviously take on some responsibilities of that business.

The most obvious one is that you receive votes to influence major company decisions, which you can exercise once a year at the annual general meeting of shareholders. The other responsibility you take on is the financial responsibility in relation to the share price. If the company goes bust, your money will be gone. However, should the company keep succeeding, you are entitled to participate in that success through a rising share price and/or dividends.

Does your investment have an effect on the share price?

Your purchase may increases the share price, or support in stabilizing it. The effect that you as an individual with only limited purchasing power might have on the share price will be very small in most cases. Some might say it’s negligible. But, there is certainly an effect.

If you purchase shares which are rising in value, you support the move up by showing confidence in the company through your willingness to pay more for it. When the share price is falling, your purchase also supports the company. This is due to a stabilizing effect that it will have on the sellers. If you wouldn’t buy the shares at the lower price, then the seller would have had to lower the price further, thus increasing the down-turn for the shares price of the company.

So whenever you buy shares, to a tiny amount you either contribute to pushing the share price higher, or help stabilising it on it’s way down at a certain level.

How does that influence the company?

The share price of a company determines the companies value. Based on the value, the company receives a range of financial options, including loans, debt issuance, credit lines and guarantees to grow or improve its operations.

Furthermore, as mentioned above, your voting rights are a benefit and a responsibility you have as an investor.

Admittedly, with only these two main points, your influence is an individual investor is very small. With limited purchasing power and therefore a small amount of shares you might purchase, your voice doesn’t get too loud. But it doesn’t mean it isn’t there.

Your part is comparable with let’s say a presidential election. Your vote alone might not appear strong, but the more people follow those same ideas and convictions you hold and exercise their rights, the more of an impact it will have on the company.

You get a voice

Looking at the points above, the process of becoming an investor is another version of a democratic system on an enterprise level. You get actively involved in it by purchasing shares of a company, and to a tiny amount, you do influence the company by purchasing shares.

Once invested, it will be up to you whether you continue holding the shares, thus contributing in keeping the share price stable. And whether you will exercise your voting rights, thus contributing to steering the company in the direction you believe to be the right one.

Do the right thing

In my opinion, investing is the only way to get a voice and a say with even large companies. For many it doesn’t sound like much, but I see it otherwise. It’s a great opportunity to have influence beyond the small bubbles of our own lives.

For example: Just imagine, if all members of an environmental NGO would unite and purchase shares of a company which is responsible for environmental pollution.

With enough shares and votes on hand, they would very likely receive the opportunity to change the direction of a company. They would receive the rights to support or to reject decisions on who runs the company, where money is being invested, and which policies are being drawn going forward. With only as little as 10% ownership they already could assemble veto rights, and insights into the companies internal processes and decisions which they won’t get in any other (legal) way.

So, if you want to help others doing the right thing. Invest. Invest consciously in good companies to continue supporting them in doing the right thing. And if you want to contribute in bad companies becoming better (or less bad), purchase shares of bad companies and exercise your voting rights, to help the company doing the right thing.

The next downturn is coming

The last few weeks have been pretty interesting. First the stock market crashed. Then it started to rise and became “the most hated rally” in history. And now it’s back to crash again.

What I did over the recent weeks was observing which shares were rising and falling faster than others, and I did make some purchases. For most parts I bought shares of companies in the tourism and real estate sector, which fell dramatically, but which also show the most promise of rising back up swiftly once the real recovery starts.

The real recovery might take time

But indeed, the real recovery might take much longer than people, and the market, are anticipating right now. Since I work in the hospitality sector, I know very well the projections, and the expectations we are facing in the real world. And the stock market will adjust to these realities at some point.

The swings up and down right now are really extreme and show that many trades are being executed on impulse, on emotions. But in a few weeks these sporadic reactions will reduce, and real data will take over. The crazy daily swings will become moderate, and we will get back into a more stable trend.

The big question is of course whether it will be a positive, or a negative trend. And it’s really hard to determine, but personally I still expect an overall market downturn, because the recovery will take time.

The service industry is crucial – and so are spending habits

The service industry includes hospitality of all kinds. Hotels, bars, restaurants. And these businesses form not only the largest employment sector on the planet. They are also based on the idea of bringing people together. Sitting together. Spending time together.

Given that the behaviour of people has been altered due to the current pandemic, and also that it won’t likely change significantly unless there is a vaccine or cure, it’s therefore probably realistic to assume that a real recovery can only begin when this problem is solved.

Now a workable vaccine may come sometime by the end of this year, more likely during the 1st or 2nd quarter of 2021. Also, there is a high chance that the first generation of the vaccine won’t be as successful as some investors might think. The reason is simple: The first generation of vaccines is usually not the best one.

Given all these details, I would rather see any meaningful recovery to begin around the 3rd quarter of 2021. And until then, people will keep losing jobs, spendings will be marginal, travel will be restricted, and cash-flows will remain on the lower levels. Less spendings means lower revenues, lower profits, lower investments, fewer jobs, … you get the picture.

Good time to start investing

But again, as mentioned in this previous article, it might be a great opportunity for many people to start investing. While the short- and medium-term might look insecure, the long-term prospects are still in favour of investors.